poesizing
poesizing:

literarycondition:

poetryprosepeopleandplaces:

i12bent:

Romaine Brooks (May 1, 1874 - 1970): Self-Portrait, 1923 - oil on canvas (Smithsonian)
"In this painting, Romaine Brooks portrayed herself in the dark colors of a man’s outfit, her eyes veiled under the shadow of her hat brim. Brooks lived most of her life in Paris, where she crafted an androgynous appearance that challenged conventional ideas of how women should look and behave. The shadowed face in this portrait suggests that her true self is hidden behind a carefully constructed facade. The tiny flash of red on Brooks’s lapel represents the ribbon of the Legion of Honor she received for her artistic achievements, but it might also hint at the secret passions of her personal life." - Smithsonian label text
"Romaine Brooks, the daughter of a wealthy, unbalanced woman estranged from her husband before Romaine’s birth, had a miserable and unstable childhood. An insane older brother received mother’s love and attention, leaving Romaine scarred from lack of affection and acceptance. Inheritance of the huge family fortune in 1902 granted her independence, but she remained enslaved by memories of her mother’s cruelty. She studied in Rome, meeting an avant-garde group of artists, writers, and intellectuals with whom she associated in Capri, Paris, and the French Riviera.
Her Self Portrait depicts a steely figure attired in a riding habit, carrying herself confidently and with elegance. She stares relentlessly at us from beneath the brim of her hat, with eyes that could be either frightened or condemning. Her mouth, corners upturned, either smiles or sneers. The ruins behind her, as amibuous as her expression, add to the air of uncertainty about where she is and what she is thinking.
Brooks remained aloof from all artistic trends, painting, in her palette of black, white, and grays, haunting portraits of the blessed and the troubled, of socialites and intellectuals. She moved in brilliant circles and, while resisting companionship, was the object of violent passions. When she painted her own portrait, she revealed her intensely contradictory nature: extreme confidence coupled with fear of vulnerability. Her story and her work reveal much about bohemian life in the early twentieth century.” - Elizabeth Chew. Women Artists (brochure, Washington, DC: National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution).

poesizing:

literarycondition:

poetryprosepeopleandplaces:

i12bent:

Romaine Brooks (May 1, 1874 - 1970): Self-Portrait, 1923 - oil on canvas (Smithsonian)

"In this painting, Romaine Brooks portrayed herself in the dark colors of a man’s outfit, her eyes veiled under the shadow of her hat brim. Brooks lived most of her life in Paris, where she crafted an androgynous appearance that challenged conventional ideas of how women should look and behave. The shadowed face in this portrait suggests that her true self is hidden behind a carefully constructed facade. The tiny flash of red on Brooks’s lapel represents the ribbon of the Legion of Honor she received for her artistic achievements, but it might also hint at the secret passions of her personal life." - Smithsonian label text

"Romaine Brooks, the daughter of a wealthy, unbalanced woman estranged from her husband before Romaine’s birth, had a miserable and unstable childhood. An insane older brother received mother’s love and attention, leaving Romaine scarred from lack of affection and acceptance. Inheritance of the huge family fortune in 1902 granted her independence, but she remained enslaved by memories of her mother’s cruelty. She studied in Rome, meeting an avant-garde group of artists, writers, and intellectuals with whom she associated in Capri, Paris, and the French Riviera.

Her Self Portrait depicts a steely figure attired in a riding habit, carrying herself confidently and with elegance. She stares relentlessly at us from beneath the brim of her hat, with eyes that could be either frightened or condemning. Her mouth, corners upturned, either smiles or sneers. The ruins behind her, as amibuous as her expression, add to the air of uncertainty about where she is and what she is thinking.

Brooks remained aloof from all artistic trends, painting, in her palette of black, white, and grays, haunting portraits of the blessed and the troubled, of socialites and intellectuals. She moved in brilliant circles and, while resisting companionship, was the object of violent passions. When she painted her own portrait, she revealed her intensely contradictory nature: extreme confidence coupled with fear of vulnerability. Her story and her work reveal much about bohemian life in the early twentieth century.” - Elizabeth Chew. Women Artists (brochure, Washington, DC: National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution).

softbipolarity

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Molly Landreth

Embodiment: A Portrait of Queer Life in America

1. Ducky and Her Friends, Cedar Rapids, IA. 2007 

2. Ashley, Jackson, MS. 2009 I think about my life and how hard it is to be a loud mouth, out of the closet, black lesbian living in the south and how I wouldnt change it for the world. - Ashley

3. Cat and Brittany, Iowa City, IA. 2009 I gave you my heart six years ago and you have cradled it more gently than I have. I promise to hold your heart, your hand, and your body with love and respect and joy yesterday, today and tomorrow. - Cat speaking to Brittany during their wedding ceremony which was held the day after this photograph was taken.

4. Charlie and Honey, Seattle, WA. 2005

5. Cooper, Oakland, CA. 2009 At the second this image is captured, however, I am beaming from the inside out. Cant recall what nudged me toward this moment of joy. But I am grateful for the reminder. - Cooper

6. Gary and Jeremy, Brooklyn, NY. 2005

7. The Jentlemen of Distinction, East Saint Louis, MO. 2009 Being a Jentlemen is about hard work, dedication and being a family. These are my BROTHERS, no matter whatâ?¦. I am PROUD to be a Jentlemen. I hold my head up high and proud! - Dusty of The Jentlemen of Distinction

8. Nomy, Oakland, CA

9. Chickadee and Her Family, Concrete, WA. 

10. Jesus, Dallas, TX. 2009 Thank you so much for doing this project as well as allowing me to become a part of it. You guys came into my life during a chapter of my metamorphosis where I felt that I had no chance at life and I have found an immense source of inspiration from you alls presence. - Jesus